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Welcome to Volume 6 of The Marocharim Experiment. This blog is authored and maintained by Marocharim, the self-professed antichrist of new media.



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Marocharim is a 21-year-old college senior from the University of the Philippines Baguio, majoring in Social Anthropology and has a minor in Political Science. He lives with his parents, his brother and his sister in Baguio City - having been born and raised there all his life. He is the author of three book-versions of The Marocharim Experiment.

Most of his time is spent at school, where he can be found in the UP Baguio Library reading or scribbling notes, and sometimes hanging out with his friends or by himself in the kiosks, or the main lobby. During his spare time, he continues writing. When not in school he hangs out with his friends, or takes long walks around Baguio City to, as he puts it, "get lost."

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The Marocharim Experiment Volume I: The Trial of Another Mind, Subject to Disclosure is Available Now

The Marocharim Experiment Volume II: The Nevermind Chronicles is Available Now

The Marocharim Experiment Volume III: The Sentence Construction of Reality is Available Now

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September 11, 2007
The Trial

< hmmm... >

   It's not by coincidence that I was reading Franz Kafka's "The Trial" today: it's not that I think Joseph Estrada is innocent, but because Josef K. is the exact antithesis of Erap.  Unlike Josef K., Joseph E. knew exactly what crime he's in the Sandiganbayan for.  Unlike Josef K., Joseph E. wasn't tortured and treated "like a dog."

   I remember joining EDSA Dos from right here in Baguio: along with the throng in Malcolm Square, I demanded Estrada's ouster.  I don't think I was a naïve high school student back then: if Erap didn't deserve to go to jail because of plunder, Erap deserved to go to jail for incompetence.  Looking back, incompetence is not a crime you can go to jail for.

   This is at the root of our whole problem with Erap: we're at that point where we really have to look back.  EDSA Dos promised a whole new beginning: a departure from the prophecy of a political Apocalypse brought about by a rotund, tsinelas-wearing, incompetent buffoon impersonating a mandated President.  The reason why we joined in the spirit of EDSA on that January day in 2001 is because we also joined in the spirit of change that EDSA represented.  However, that change took form in a "departure" no different from Erap: a short, pantsuit-wearing, incompetent buffoon impersonating a President, only without a mandate.  That other buffoon is no less than Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo: another person who deserves to be tried at the Sandiganbayan.

   Personally, I'd rather have Erap convicted.  After all, Estrada said that he'd rather go to Muntinlupa, but he never said anything about going to Bilibid.  Second, I'd like to see this country degenerate into a few days of chaos and turmoil.  Third, I really do believe that Erap is guilty of graft, corruption, and plunder.

   But I draw the line at another EDSA.


Posted at Tuesday, September 11, 2007 by marocharim
Revolt!  

September 10, 2007
Six 9/11s

< hmmm... >

   "America has acted in recent years as if to be on the receiving end of evil is, in itself, to be good.  That being opposed to wrong is not the same thing as being right, that being a victim is not the same as being an innocent are ideas not warmly entertained of late in the land of the free."

- Pico Iyer, "Move On"
TIME, 8 September 2003

   Tomorrow, America celebrates the sixth year anniversary of 9/11.  It's been six years since that awful sight of an airplane cutting through the World Trade Center.  And it has been six years of awful sights of car bombs and dead bodies in the Middle East over the War on Terror.

   No, I'm not anti-American, but seeing how Americans deal with tragedy and disaster makes me contemplate on Pico Iyer's essay even more.  Hurricane Katrina made international headlines: two years later, CNN's Anderson Copper is still going at it.  The sight of helpless Americans in New Orleans is one thing, but it seems that an indifference is manifested in people not remembering the tsunami that swept through South Asia two years ago.  The difference is very stark: while the tsunami victims have rebuilt their lives themselves, the Americans didn't.

   Yet it isn't just about America's indifference towards the plight of other nations experiencing disaster while showing us a scar in Katrina.  This is about America, six 9/11s after the first plane crashed through the World Trade Center in an act of terror, going on with its war and showing us a scar that we've been so grown to seeing.  A few years ago, we saw Saddam Hussein's statue toppled in Baghdad.  Years later, we're seeing the desert cities of Iraq still under siege: the arbitrary "enemy" looming, but still not there.

   The war that America fought has gone through so many changes that we who are not in America's shores no longer know what exactly is the reason why an American soldier in Iraq dons his fatigues and fires his bullets.  First it was Osama bin Laden, then it became Saddam Hussein, then we're at that point where the "enemy" becomes a vague idea behind a mask that labels him an "extremist," and even to the halls of the US government itself.  Too many of these American soldiers are fighting a war half a world away to protect their people at the expense of innocent civilians who surely have a right to peace.

   For the past six years, there is no "global news" that doesn't revolve around America's war on terrorism: if anything, we non-Americans are learning more and more about the way America is.  As a non-American, there's a part of me that sympathizes with the loss of life in 9/11, and there's a part of me that blames the loss of even more lives in Iraq and Afghanistan because of how America responded to 9/11.  And then there's a part of me that asks if America is still mortally wounded over 9/11, or if it's showing me and the rest of the world an old scar that has already been healed over after six 9/11s.


Posted at Monday, September 10, 2007 by marocharim
Revolt!  

September 9, 2007
The Sensible Computer

< hmmm... >

   I'm not exactly a computer expert, but often, people ask me for advice on what computer should they buy.  It's no easy task to buy a computer, especially with all the marketing strategies for really fast processors, loads of RAM, high-capacity hard drives, and so on and so forth.

   Now if you're not that into computing, you would probably spend a lot of money on an ultra-fast PC (or if you're really rich, a Mac) that you only use for basic computing tasks like word processing.  The problem with many computer buyers is that they're drawn to the marketing strategies more than the sensibility of why they have a computer in the first place.

   Selling computers nowadays is a lot like selling snake oil.  I've seen too many people have PC's that have everything, but they do very little with it: an Intel 3.6 GHz Core 2 processor, 2 GB of RAM, a 160 GB hard drive, a high-speed DVD-RW, a high-performance GeForce video card, a 5.1 surround sound system, an LCD screen... the works.  I would give my left arm for a computer like that (I won't miss it), but the owner basically just uses it for typing a paper.

   To me, high-end computers are for high-end users: these are people who really need the power.  Hardcore gamers, computer programmers and those who do animation are well-suited for these extremely powerful computers.  If you're the type of person who doesn't do any of those things, you might want to consider buying a cheaper computer: a sensible one that gets the job done.

   If I were you, I won't worry so much about "obsolescence:" there's nothing wrong with a second-hand Pentium III if all you're going to do is to type or if you're not into these graphics-heavy games.  I'm not saying that you should go off to a surplus shop to buy an antiquated Pentium MMX that runs on Windows 3.11, but "obsolete" only applies when you can no longer use the computer effectively.

   "Sensible," of course, depends on your sensibilities.  But here are some tips on "The Sensible Computer:"

*      *      *

   Define your practical purpose.  Buying a computer always starts with the question, "What is it for?"  "Computing" can mean so many things, but it always boils down to what your idea of computing is.  Be practical: with the state of the economy today, we all have to settle for practical computers and not dream machines.  Figure out what you need to do first, then figure out what you want to do by the time you have that computer.  Remember that powerful computers amount to big electric bills, so settle for a computer that will be well worth your money in the long run.

   Laptop or desktop?  To be honest, I'm partial to desktops.  The way I see it, you should only get a laptop if you do a lot of travelling and a lot of computing while travelling: not too many people do that.  Again, be practical: often, the lowest price for a new laptop can get you a more powerful desktop.  Computers are more of practical tools than status symbols: sure, you get some positive reinforcement by carrying a laptop around (an ego-boost), but I wouldn't be surprised if your ego gets deflated by the time your laptop is stolen.  Laptops are also notoriously hard to repair and upgrade: by the time a part gets busted, the recourse is always to get a new laptop.

   "Performance" is what you do with your computer.  What your computer can do is one thing, but what you do with your computer is another.  I'm not saying you should tinker with your computer (but if you can, go ahead, as long as you know what you're doing), but there's nothing wrong with a "slow" computer as long as it serves your purpose.  If all you do is type, there's no difference between a high-end computer, an entry-level computer, and a second-hand computer.  Consider buying a faster computer if you start to dabble into things like animation, graphics, or if you start to be obsessed with computer games.

   Operating systems.  I'm not saying that you should buy a jurassic 386 and use WordStar for your documents, Symphony for your spreadsheets and play retro games (no, wait, I encourage you to play DOS-based games), but all this hoopla about Windows basically boils down once again to purpose.  Sure, Vista is cool-looking, but there's nothing wrong with good-old XP, or even older Windows versions like NT, 2000, NT, or even Win98.  The key is to have your installer CDs ready: never, ever, buy a computer where they don't give you an installer for your OS (with the money you're paying for it).  Also, consider open-source: Linux is a very stable, reliable, and reasonable operating system.  As far as Windows is concerned, all Windows versions since Win95 operate on the same basic principle of the Start Menu, My Documents, My Computer and the Recycle Bin.  Your choice of an OS depends on what programs you use.

   "Obsolete."  The term "obsolete" is a nuanced expression: if you have your installers handy, you won't even need technical support (just re-install your program and you're fine).  There's no shame in having an "obsolete" computer if it serves your purposes: if you can still use it for your pertinent needs like word processing, it's perfectly fine.  "Obsolete" is an exigency applicable to business firms who need the technical support that comes with constant upgrades, updates, and the money to buy new computers.  For ordinary home users, this operational definition does not apply.

   Do you even need a computer?  Yes, this is a perfectly legitimate question to ask.  Computers are commitments as much as they are everything else: weigh your priorities.  "Need" is often mistaken for "want" as it is often psychologically created.  The way I see it, the only time you'll actually need a computer is if you can no longer get by computer rental shops.  Computers are expensive enough as they are: these are things you can't get by on a whim.  If you can't afford a computer, stick by with things you can actually afford (like shoes, for example) or save up your money until you can buy a machine that suits you.

*      *      *

   My concept of the "sensible computer" is one that may raise a few eyebrows, since all those tips arrive at the conclusion that it all depends on your practicalities and sensibilities.  Basically, for low-end computing (like typing papers and such), you can get by with a cheap second-hand computer from the surplus shop.  High-end users (not prospective high-end users) would go for those ultra-powerful computers.  But if you're a mid-range user (the bulk of the computing population), I suggest the most reasonably-priced computer that can boot Windows XP in more or less 15 seconds.


Posted at Sunday, September 09, 2007 by marocharim
Revolt!  

High School Musicrap

< oh boy >

   I would rather have it if "Jihad the Musical," where "I Wanna Be Like Osama" could be the next "We're All In This Together."

   Tonight, "High School Musical 2" will make its Asian premiere at Disney Channel.  I'm going out on a limb in saying that I fart in the general direction of anyone who watches "High School Musical:" anyone who watches it has a hamster for a mother and a father whose breath smells like elderberries (yes, I just watched "Monty Python" movies).

   Why "High School Musical" is so popular, I don't know.  I heard in "The Tonight Show" that "High School Musical 2" is the highest-rating made-for-TV movie in basic cable, but to be perfectly honest, I could care less.  The way I see it, "High School Musical" is the populist version of Broadway: it's something you watch if you don't understand "RENT," "The King and I," "The Phantom of the Opera," "West Side Story," "A Chorus Line," and "Chicago."

   That's all.


Posted at Sunday, September 09, 2007 by marocharim
(1) vomitted  

September 8, 2007
The Most Progressive Love Song Ever

< hmmm... >

   Among activists and militants, the "love song" of choice is not part of mainstream recording: it's "Rosas ng Digma" by Buklod.  Personally, "Rosas" is too convenient to be an anthem for romance at a time of revolution: the theme is just too obvious.  If you're a militant in love, you might as well be sharing this song with a whole lot of people that your romance ceases to have that unique musical flavor.

   Anyway, here are the lyrics for "Rosas ng Digma:

*      *      *

Rosas ng Digma
Buklod

Sumibol sa isang panahong marahas
Bawat pagsubok ay iyong hinarap
At hangga't ang laya'y di pa nakakamtan
Buhay mo'y aking laan

Namumukadkad at puno ng sigla
Tulad mo'y rosas sa hardin ng digma
At di maiwasa'y sa 'yo ay humanga
Ang tulad kong mandirigma

Ako'y nangangarap na ika'y makasama
Taglay ang pangakong iingatan kita
Ang ganda mong nahubog sa piling ng masa
Hinding-hindi kukupas, 'di malalanta...

Ang kulay mong angkin, sintingkad ng dugo
Nagbibigay buhay sa bawat puso
Tinik mo'y sagisag ng tapang at giting
Sa larawa'y kislap ng bituin

Ako'y nangangarap na ika'y makasama
Taglay ang pangakong iingatan kita
Ang ganda mong nahubog sa piling ng masa
Hinding-hindi kukupas, 'di malalanta...

Gaya ng pag-ibig, na alay ko sinta...

*      *      *

   I say, big deal: you want "progressive?"  You want a song that literally oozes love at a time of war and revolution?  You want a song so Marxist, so militant, something that speaks of the same love as "Rosas" and then some?  Never fear: Marocharim is here.  Upon a random Google search and a brief review of my MP3s, I finally found the most progressive love song ever: Joe Lamont's "Victims of Love."

   Enjoy.

*      *      *

Victims of Love
Joe Lamont

Our hearts have been to battle
Our souls went into war
We lost the will to carry on
We don't believe no more

Or why should we have said
That this would never happen to us?
How long could we be
'Coz baby here we are

Victims of love
A broken-down affair
So sad to see the debris
Scattered everywhere

Victims of love
Still cannot believe
We're the victims of a love
We cannot retrieve

It used to be so easy
It used to be so good
We had an understanding
That got misunderstood

I thought we were survivors
And we'll never go down
And now we're just outsiders
As our love comes stumbling down

Victims of love
A broken-down affair
So sad to see the debris
Scattered everywhere

Victims of love
Still cannot believe
We're the victims of a love
We cannot retrieve

Maybe we played it a bit too sure
And everything is hearts and roses
Now Fate stood still and closed the door
And we were just left standing
'Till we realized the ending
Was so near...
Where do we go from here?

Victims of love
A broken-down affair
So sad to see the debris
Scattered everywhere

Victims of love
Still cannot believe
We're the victims of a love
We cannot retrieve


Posted at Saturday, September 08, 2007 by marocharim
(1) vomitted  

September 7, 2007
Sexymarocharim22

< the things i think of from reading my tagboard >

   If I were dead, I would be rolling over in my grave with the idea that I'm "sexy."  Sexiness is not something I associate myself with, considering that I am getting a bit of bilbil from the lack of exercise I have been doing.  Besides, the mythological conception of Marocharim is a rotund, nerdy blogger with thick black-rimmed glasses.  I may be getting a bit of fat around the hips, but it's not enough for me to be considered "fat."  My glasses are half-rimmed, although make no mistake about it: you can kill a group of ants with them on a warm sunny day.  Heck, on a particularly sunny day, I managed to light a cigarette with the left lens.  Save for my vices, I am a nerd... and I'm damn proud to be one.

   Of course, I'm not macho: for all intents and purposes, I'm a wimp.  The reason why I wear a jacket is because I need to add some bulk to my frame.  I'm kind of self-conscious about my lack of muscular definition: I do have muscles, but I can make for a good case for the logical fallacy of seeing is believing.  Even a blind man would not consider me an Arnold Schwarzenegger.

   I don't know if it's an ego boost to append the suffix "sexy" in a virtual pseudonym (particularly e-mail addresses).  "Sexy," to me, is a definition of the situation: it's not solely psychological.  "Fat" is such an ugly word: but if the backs of your thighs are dimpled with cellulite, if your boobs do not bisect your vertical axis in a perpendicular line, or if you're just horrifyingly ugly that you can make an onion cry, you're anything but "sexy."

   And because I don't show the backs of my thighs, I have no boobs, and I have made people with the same qualities as onions cry, I am anything but "sexy."


Posted at Friday, September 07, 2007 by marocharim
Revolt!  

Marocharim.com

< oh boy >

   I was checking my e-mail today when I came across a legitimate e-mail from the good people of PinoyBlogosphere.com notifying me that because I won the Participants' Choice Award in the recently-concluded Wika2007 Blog Writing Contest, I have the prize of a free domain name and webhosting service for one year.  Yup, the project of Marocharim.com is now a reality.  I'd like to thank everyone who supported me in that cause: the 17 people who voted for my entry, and of course the participants who chose me as their pick to win the contest.

   Yup, Marocharim.com exists.  The only problem is I don't know how to use HTML.

   My idea for Marocharim.com is not the shameless self-glorification that there is in The Marocharim Experiment.  Basically, I'll still do my blogging here.  I envision Marocharim.com to be a lot of things:

  • A repository for the things I have written that are still "alive" in my home computer.  This includes everything from term papers, short essays (what I like to call "non-experiments," constructs, drafts, and so on and so forth.  It's all a matter of compiling stuff into convenient PDF's (protected to ensure that nobody passes off any paper I've written as his/her own) and such.
  • A repository for the things I have written that are found in those moldy notebooks in my bookshelf.  In retrospect, those scribbles make a lot of sense.  Some kid out there would deem my one-liners to be what Edmund Husserl was to Martin Heidegger (just an example: just because I consider myself Husserlian doesn't mean that I'm a synoptic extension of Husserl).  Besides, all my best thoughts are written in those notebooks.
  • A repository for the things other people have written that may find a good home in the public space that is the Internet.  Consider those students, faculty members and such who have written so much in the way of great ideas, but don't have a place to make themselves heard.  Here's a great chance for them to do so.

   Which brings me to my problem: I don't know how to use HTML, and I don't know shat about this "webhosting" thing.  So I'm asking goodwilled bloggers everywhere if you could teach me how to get around having an appealing site for these objectives.  Drop me a line.

   And again, thank you: without you, Marocharim.com would never be a reality.


Posted at Friday, September 07, 2007 by marocharim
Revolt!  

September 6, 2007
Vienna Sausage

< hmmm... >

   Whenever I'm going to write about an OFW-related entry, I'm going to do the exact opposite of what Malu Fernandez does: I'm not going to ridicule the OFW, but I'm going to ridicule the OFW's (hyper)extended family.  In the interest of "senseless and subjective" articles I have always been derided for by my peers in the campus press, I'm going to talk about vienna sausage.

*      *      *

   The things that line the bottom of a seemingly endless Balikbayan Box almost always include American tinned food.  After relatives figuratively rape the box out of its proverbial hymen composed of shoes and jeans, the OFW takes it upon himself/herself to fairly distribute the "relief goods."

   You would know if someone has a relative overseas, and how close he/she is to that relative, depending on how many vienna sausage cans are there in his/her kitchen cupboard.  I'm talking about those imported tins with easy-open tabs, not the local Philips or CDO brand vienna sausages that you open with a can opener.  To me, Libby's vienna sausage is a status symbol: it's not really something to eat per se, but a measure of the standard of living enjoyed by an economic parasite.  It's décor, not food: people stack them in such a way that they occupy more dominant, visible places than signs of poverty like bagoong, watered-down bottles of banana ketchup, and that old gin-bottle of soy sauce where the remains crystallize on the bottom.

   As it seems, opening a tin of sausage is like a "taste of America:" that this must be the way people live there (forgetting, of course, that your usual OFW skips meals to save enough money for your whims of original Nike shoes or a laptop computer).  But the promise of an "American taste" turns into culinary ennui: it doesn't taste any better than local brands of canned sausage.  It has a certain rubbery, plastic feel in it that you might as well think that you're literally eating a penis (not that I know anything about cannibalistic fellatio).  The promise of eating "American food" is not what it's cut out to be.

   I've taken the liberty to read the labels of vienna sausage and found that there's nothing so Vienna about it: it's basically made up of processed chicken parts and other sorts of meat.  In a land generally associated with steak dinners, it's pretty hard for me to imagine that vienna sausage is "American food."  I even doubt that OFW's consider it as such: I am told that in some places, Filipinos plant sitaw and sampalok to make sinigang.  The canned stuff are reserved for friends and family on the other side of the Pacific, who think that Libby's is quintessential Americana (the collective description for American cultural facts, not the suit jacket) and SPAM is "what they eat in America."

   Ah, the revenge of the OFW: vienna sausage, meals-ready-to-eat... so you see, Malu Fernandez, they aren't as dumb as you claim them to be.  As soon as they board off their plane and into the shores of America, they indulge in the pleasures of tortang talong from that bundle of Filipino eggplants wrapped around a pair of pants.

   You may take the Filipino out of the Philippines, but you can't take the Philippines out of the Filipino.


Posted at Thursday, September 06, 2007 by marocharim
Revolt!  

September 5, 2007
An OFW's Story

< hmmm... >

   I'm not going to do a Malu Fernandez here: I happen to like OFW's.  Like many Filipinos, I'm a literal parasite to pasalubong, dollars, and American potted meat.  Everyone is: even the amnesiac would remember his/her shoe size and look for the pair of shoes with his/her name on it.  The Balikbayan Box would literally be raided for SPAM, macaroni and cheese, Levi's jeans and "blue seal" cigarettes.

   Left with nothing but the remnants of the box and the sight of ingrate commensals crowding his/her niche in a social system where he/she is touted as a "modern-day hero," the OFW could seem to be a real martyr to the cause of material gratification for the over-extended Filipino family.  The poor OFW might as well head off to "Wowowee," make a hat out of one-dollar bills, put it on Willie Revillame's head and get a shot at greeting family members from the unofficial Filipino province that is California.  Then the wretch gets maligned in a Malu Fernandez column.

   While I've eaten my own fair share of American-made corned beef and found out that the powdered cheese in Kroeger mac-and-cheese microwaveable dinners is essentially the same as the stuff you get at a Potato Corner with your french fries, there is hope.  The OFW isn't a wretch after all: he/she goes to the crowded Duty Free shop at the NAIA and buys a Magic Sing.

   Now it all makes sense why OFW's are asking our government to fix a stable exchange rate for OFW's.


Posted at Wednesday, September 05, 2007 by marocharim
Revolt!  

September 4, 2007
Our Wowowee'd Senate

< hmmm... >

   There was once a move by some "honorable" members of Congress to abolish the Senate.  Looking back, they have a pretty good point.  On one desk, you have a lunatic in Miriam Defensor-Santiago who wants to abolish fraternities in UP.  On one desk, you're supposed to have Antonio Trillanes IV, but we're still mulling over the issue of whether or not he should be allowed to attend Senate sessions on the grounds that he's still incarcerated over a mutiny charge.  And still on another desk, you have Mar Roxas calling for a probe on the controversy surrounding "Wowowee" and the "Wilyonaryo" segment.

   As a casual follower of Philippine politics (as "casual" as I will get, given that I'm a political science student), I could put up with Miriam's hectoring pontifications, and I'm willing to help put up iron bars on Trillanes' desk if that's our problem.  But seeing "Mr. Palengke" on TV saying that he'll start a Senate probe over "Wilyonaryo" kind of makes me wonder if he really won his seat in the Senate because of a jingle to the tune of "Mr. Suave."

   The way I see it, the Senate has more pressing issues to attend to than a game show fiasco.  Here's a Senate that can't decide among themselves if they should open an envelope or play an audio CD in aid of investigations, but would probe a game show for all its worth.  Here's a Senate that would be willing to squabble over prizes in a game show, but can't squabble over the prices of goods in markets.  Here's a Senate that would go after game show hosts, but would not go after two people who once headed the government and turned it into a game show (you already know who I'm talking about).

   If the Senate would rather investigate game shows, I'd rather have them investigate why Chloe McCully of "Kapamilya: Deal or No Deal" is so damn beautiful (it's a joke).  But much to my chagrin as a voter, a (community) taxpayer and a consequence of a political system, a top-ranking Senator goes after small fry, after legislative galunggong.

   Senator Roxas, to quote Miriam Santiago, "What planet are you from?"


Posted at Tuesday, September 04, 2007 by marocharim
(2) vomitted  

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